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June 2, 2014 - Dylan Burkhardt

NBA Draft Shot Chart: Marcus Smart

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Marcus Smart returned to school to answer the big question about his game. He wanted to prove that he could knock down the three-point shot consistently.

Smart failed to answer that question and left school with a headache after a sophomore season that didn’t go at all how he imagined. Oklahoma State lost seven games in a row in early February as Smart was suspended for going into the stands and the Cowboys were dispatched easily in the NCAA tournament after barely limping in. Smart was a more efficient offensive player (thanks to improved two-point shooting), but he was only able to raise his three-point shooting percentage by .09% in his sophomore season.

Smart was just 11-of-54 on guarded catch-and-shoot jump shots as a sophomore, a figure which ranks in just the 13th percentile nationally per Synergy Sports. His poor shooting in the corners, which are generally catch and shoot jumpers, illustrates this fact quite clearly. He wasn’t much better above the wings either.

Despite the somewhat disappointing sophomore season, Smart is still projected as a top-ten pick.

What Smart can do is bully his way to the paint and finish at the rim. He shot 67% around the rim and that’s a very impressive number for a guard. At 6-foot-3,  227 pounds and with a wingspan over 6-foot-9, Smart has the type of physical profile to infer that, with time, he’ll be able to bully opponents at the professional level too. He also brings a lot to the table that you won’t find on a shot chart. He gets to the free throw line, he gets into passing lanes defensively, he’s a good rebounder and he’s also a plus-passer at the point guard position.

More NBA Draft Shot Charts:

Players / Shot Charts Marcus Smart / NBA Draft /